Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Freedom Walk

a Biblical thought...
God heard their groaning and he remembered his covenant with Abraham, with Isaac and with Jacob. So God looked on the Israelites and was concerned about them. (Exodus 2:24-25)

a Book thought...
God made the human heart to dream, and the dream that is most fulfilling of all is the one He has put into your heart. (p136)
a Dave thought...
Yesterday afternoon over 600 of us took part in a Stop The Traffik Freedom Walk from South Yarra to Federation Square. With Steve Chalk the founder of STT leading the way we all grabbed a piece of the 200 metre long rope and dressed in black complete with gags and bar codes on our backs made the 3km trek. When we reached the CBD we obviously drew a lot of attention as we all gathered and prayed and read a declaration that showed our passion to help the victims of human trafficking. It was a really moving time and I felt in union with God Himself as we made a stand for those that cannot stand themselves.

Just a thought.

4 comments:

One of your Jultopia Gold Coast teammates said...

Dave, still enjoying your blog 7 months after Jultopia Gold Coast (hope to see you again in Jultopia Gosford and we've got a spot for ya if you're looking for a game)but I have a question about your "Freedom Walk" post.

Is civil disobedience ever OK? Is breaking the law ever an acceptable way to have your voice heard? Was Nelson Mandela a hero or a terrorist? Sure, he led an entire race to freedom, but he killed and harmed countless people along the way with his terrorist methods.

Just a thought.

PS. Tell the organisers that Movember finished months ago. ;-)

Anonymous said...

I'm not sure this was civil disobedience anyways - I don't think any laws were broken . . . .

Anonymous said...

It is certainly not illegal to peacefully protest in Melbourne. Maybe the JBP rules about public gatherings still apply in Queensland, but not in Victoria. Annette

Anonymous said...

When a law in unjust, it is the Christian's responsibility to break that law, yes?

The key is, though, that you're not trying to get away with breaking that law. You face the penalty for breaking it. You acknowledge that the government has the right to make and enforce laws, but that you disagree with the justice of this particular law.

This is not anarchistic, it is actually part of the creation and maintenance of a civic society.

Grace,

Aaron